Pleasanton Unified School District (PUSD) will have a healthy budget in the next Fiscal Year and the following two years, a performance that is important for budget projections that districts make at this time of year.

Deputy Superintendent of Business Services Micaela Ochoa and consultant Tom Gray provided an update on projected budget numbers at the June 11 meeting. The board needs to approve the final budget at its June 25 meeting. The State Legislature has set a June 30 deadline for a vote on its budget. Most school money comes from the state, with only a small percentage coming from federal sources.

If a projection showed that PUSD would not have an adequate funding for its programs for the remainder of this Fiscal Year or two subsequent years, the district would not qualify for a positive certification. That would bring extra supervision from the Alameda County Office of Education, until PUSD improved its outlook. However, there are no worries, because the district meets the requirement, said Ochoa and Gray.

WHEELS ADDING BUSES FOR AMADOR

The board also heard an update on efforts to offset the loss of parking at Amador High School for the first eight weeks of the fall semester, while solar panels are being installed in the parking lot.

Since the board last looked at the situation in early May, Wheels has said it will be adding early and late buses to Lines 10R, 605 and 611, which connect with Santa Rita Road, where the high school is located.

PUSD is exploring other options during the solar installation, including the nearby Valley Community Church’s offer of 32 spaces, provision of temporary bike racks and pedestrian access, and striping of an asphalt area adjacent to the school for additional staff parking.

The work is scheduled to be 90% finished by Oct. 15, and completed in December.

AMADOR TEACHER UP FOR A GRAMMY

Superintendent David Haglund told trustees that Amador Director of Bands Jonathan Grantham has been nominated for the 2020 Grammy Music Educator Award.

Grantham is among 189 quarterfinalists from 179 cities who are in the running to receive cash honorariums, with matching sums for their music programs. Some 3300 were nominated.

Haglund said he hopes to see Grantham on the Grammy stage when the awards are presented. This is the 7th year in the 64-year history of the Grammys that music directors will be honored.

Grantham has received many awards in his 12 years at Amador. He was chosen as district Teacher of the Year in 2012-13, and earned an Excellence in Education Award from the district in 2009.

Grantham directs a band program of 300 students, five concert ensembles, two jazz bands, the school’s marching band, chamber ensembles, and percussion. Under his leadership, the band program doubled in enrollment. Its wind ensemble has performed at state conferences, and at a clinic in Chicago. He has served as a guest conductor, and a board member for school music organizations.